TCA Adds More Pathways

In 2018, The Career Academy is opening more pathways for students who have expressed interest in careers not yet supported at TCA. The two that start next fall are Criminal Justice (at The Career Academy) and Automotive Tech (at Lincoln High & Northeast). There is considerable interest for both pathways with 64 signing up for Criminal Justice and 19 for Automotive Tech so far. As with all Career Academy pathways, students will be able to earn dual credit with discounted tuition through Southeast Community College and can qualify for certification.

The Criminal Justice pathway courses include Intro to Criminal Justice, Police, Courts & Judicial Systems, and Criminal Law, among other offerings. Community partners include law enforcement and corrections so that students have opportunities to experience the pathway fully.

The Automotive Tech pathway will include General Maintenance, Engines, Brakes, and Electrical systems. These advanced classes reach beyond what LPS currently offers.

Donor funds have enabled students to take field trips, fund capstone projects, and compete in local, state, and national student competitions.

“The total of these experiences allow students to go more deeply into their pathway and determine if their perception of the path is in fact reality,” said Dan Hohensee, director of the academy. He points out that many students find their “fit” and also gain confidence from the variety of experiences offered at TCA. “This is only possible through the funding of our generous donors,” he said. “Those funds truly help build and support the future talent pipeline.”

“Our community sponsors are a big part of this educational experience. Their engagement and funding assists in creating a robust learning environment,” said Wendy Van, president of the Foundation. “We are very grateful to all of our sponsors and donors.” The advantage of The Career Academy is that it creates real opportunities to enhance students’ personal and academic success, helping them to reach their full potential. 

“Students find their fit in the world and gain confidence that they are capable of whatever they set their minds to,” Hohensee said.